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Full Version: Reverse alchemy: replacing precious platinum with ignoble iron. Future for Silver?
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Interesting read.....As time goes on, I suspect other industrial based precious metals including Silver, will go through a similar process as industry looks for cheaper substitutes.

"As a base test case, the team studied the formation of 3-octyl-1,1,1,3,5,5,5-heptamethyltrisiloxane (for those who despised organic chemistry like I did, this is basically a silicone compound terminated by seven methyl groups hanging off the end of an octane chain). It's a compound commercially used in agricultural and cosmetic products. The reagents used to synthesize this compound were (Me3SiO)2MeSiH, termed MD'M, and 1-octene. In the presence of the iron catalyst and fairly mild conditions (barely above room temperature), 2000 ppm of the catalyst would yield over 98 percent conversion to the desired product.
From a chemistry standpoint this is great news—near complete conversion is considered a positive, and there was no evidence of any other side reaction products. That means no additional purification before adding the results to commercial products.

Here again, the researchers found that the addition of only 500ppm of one of the iron catalysts in a silicone fluid solution resulted in a nicely crosslinked polymer within two hours. As an added bonus, this process does not require the use of toluene, which is needed in the existing reaction to to get the fluid and catalyst to play nicely with one another. Analysis of the final product showed that it was structurally identical to those prepared commercially using platinum catalysts.

Based on the Science article, it seems like this class of bis(imino)pyridine iron dinitrogen complexes provides a promising route for industrially relevant reactions. The simple fact that it replaces a high cost material with a readily available and cheap metal is a boost right away. We still need to know how readily (affordably) the iron catalysts can be made and how easily they can be separated back out from the product stream. Even if it is cheaper then platinum, no one wants to see their catalyst only get used once and then be lost forever."


http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2012...e-iron.ars
Another interesting read as it relates to the diamond industry. Looks like precious metals are headed in the same direction. Although not in time for this current currency crisis. May make one reconsider the long term hold or passing metals on to the next generation imo. Food for thought fwiw...


Diamonds on Demand
Lab-grown gemstones are now practically indistinguishable from mined diamonds. Scientists and engineers see a world of possibilities; jewelers are less enthusiastic

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-na...emand.html


The New Diamond Age

Armed with inexpensive, mass-produced gems, two startups are launching an assault on the De Beers cartel.
Next up: the computing industry.

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.09/diamond.html



Consumer perspective, non-industrial.

The day may come when the diamonds adorning red-carpet celebrities come from a factory in Florida rather than a mine in Liberia, but don't expect a huge paradigm shift just yet.

http://news.cnet.com/Synthetic-diamonds-...59542.html

http://faculty.fuqua.duke.edu/~dm121/pap...ilemma.pdf
(02-07-2012 04:55 AM)JPMsecretagent Wrote: [ -> ]Another interesting read as it relates to the diamond industry. Looks like precious metals are headed in the same direction. Although not in time for this current currency crisis. May make one reconsider the long term hold or passing metals on to the next generation imo. Food for thought fwiw...


Diamonds on Demand
Lab-grown gemstones are now practically indistinguishable from mined diamonds. Scientists and engineers see a world of possibilities; jewelers are less enthusiastic

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-na...emand.html


The New Diamond Age

Armed with inexpensive, mass-produced gems, two startups are launching an assault on the De Beers cartel.
Next up: the computing industry.

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.09/diamond.html



Consumer perspective, non-industrial.

The day may come when the diamonds adorning red-carpet celebrities come from a factory in Florida rather than a mine in Liberia, but don't expect a huge paradigm shift just yet.

http://news.cnet.com/Synthetic-diamonds-...59542.html

http://faculty.fuqua.duke.edu/~dm121/pap...ilemma.pdf

Thanks JP these were great reads, appreciate it, two thumbs up...however, not to sure which troll gave you thumbs down...but I could take a guess... Maybe it was Mr. know-it-all
Thanks for the thumbs down CD. We love you CD!
Thanks,

I thought it was interesting information. Common knowledge that industry uses science to cut production costs. Suspect if successful, silver will fall into that category over the next several decades. Also interesting regarding diamonds, De-beers still basically controlling the worlds natural diamond market.

Yes...my guess is CD.00001 had trouble leaving his silver box and looking into a possible future. Thumbs down no surprise know his limited ...................................fill in the blank. It's telling for sure.
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