Announcments
  • REALIST NEWS: Where you don't have to worry about drama. No Spam posts and STAY ON TOPIC. This is an important news website.

When posting content located on some other website, please post no more than 20% of their content and always provide a link. Also, Multiple forum handles/IDs are NOT permitted.
If you see a spam post please click the "Report" button on that specific post. Also, what I don't want on my forum is name calling and cussing at people or direct insults. Thanks


Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Votes - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Backyard farmers by necessity: self-sufficient & debt-free
07-17-2013, 05:41 PM
Post: #1
Backyard farmers by necessity: self-sufficient & debt-free
3
0

JPMsecretagent, proud member of Realist News since Jun 2011.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-17-2014, 03:24 PM
Post: #2
Exclamation Survival Gardening: The Harsh Reality
2
0
December 17, 2014

Okay, so you bought the cans cans of Survival Seeds. Your going to need more than just seed, time to gather those garden tools if you have them. If you don't it's time to head to the store and buy whatever it is you may need such as shovels, rakes, hoes and I can't stress enough gloves. You will need many pairs of gloves.


Problems, Principles & Preparation for Survival Gardening


You must prepare in advance for the kind of gardening required to live in a grid-down society. You must have a whole new approach, starting first with your attitude.

Words and actions when it comes to a disaster continues to show the tax paid help...won't be there!

Time to focus on "YOUR" home, and "YOUR" community!

Strength is in numbers...change your life for the better!


Waiting for truth and history to make a difference.

Waiting for the world to change...for the better!

Friendship/Love/Trust/Respect/Unity for all living things...

Namaste

People4People, proud member of Realist News since May 2011.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-03-2015, 01:15 AM
Post: #3
How to Grow Buckets Full of Blueberries at Home
0
0
Do you love the taste and health benefits of blueberries? Would you like a fruit crop that will produce well in a short amount of time and doesn’t require a lot of space (and can even be grown in a container)? Have you tried growing blueberries and had poor results? This post is for you! Learn how to grow blueberries at home in your own backyard.
http://beforeitsnews.com/health/2015/02/...62664.html

Thinker, proud member of Realist News since Nov 2013.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-19-2017, 01:20 AM
Post: #4
Nations Largest Organic Food Co-op Proves 'You Are What You Eat'
0
0


New Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op store opens.


2012 - Perennial Plate Visits Co-ops
Daniel Klein and Mirra Fine of Perennial Plate made their way through the United States on their "Real Food Road Trip" to tell the stories of real food and the people who provide it in every corner of the country. They stopped at food co-ops along the way to meet some local producers, share good food and learn why co-op shoppers and staff are so passionate about their food co-ops.


3 Tips to Start Your Own Co-op to Make Organic Food Affordable to Your Community

Kristina Carrillo-Bucaram who sucessfully runs one of the largest produce co-operative in the USA. In this episode you will learn 3 simple tips that will help you start your own food co-op so you can make organic produce available to people in your community.

Thinker, proud member of Realist News since Nov 2013.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
09-19-2018, 11:56 AM
Post: #5
10 Hardy Superfood Vegetables to Grow Your Fall Garden
0
0
Written by Tee Riddle

You may think that gardening for the season is finished once the summer crops begin to wane, but that’s hardly the case. In fact, your vegetable garden is truly just getting started good. There are many vegetables that grow well during the fall and even into the winter months in some cases. If you are interested in keeping some vegetables growing in your vegetable garden after the tomatoes and squash are gone, here are ten great vegetables to grow in fall.

Beets

Beets are an excellent choice for a fall garden. They love cooler temperatures and are hard to “beet” when roasted in the oven. Beets are sown directly in the garden soil most of the time, but can also be started indoors and transplanted using care. Sow the seeds a 1/2-inch deep and then plants to about six inches apart. The seeds should germinate in five to fourteen days and be ready to harvest in about 50-65 days after the seeds germinate. Beets can tolerate a few light freezes.
Not only are the roots delicious, but the tops taste great as well and contain a number of important vitamins and minerals.

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is probably one of the most under appreciated vegetables in the US. If you love turnips or collards then you should definitely grow some kohlrabi. Kohlrabi grows well in cooler temperatures and has a very distinctive look. I will admit, the first time I laid eyes on this vegetable I thought it was an alien! Don’t let the unusual look fool you – this vegetable has a rockin’ taste. it features a bulb that grows above ground with stems that project outward.

The bulbs are peeled and cooked in a variety of different ways and tastes much like a turnip. The leaves can be harvested and cooked much like collards, with a taste that is very similar.
Kohlrabi can be started indoors or sown directly in the garden. Seeds should be planted 1/2-inch deep and thinned to ten to twelve inches apart.

Lettuce

Lettuce is one of the:
https://www.jbbardot.com/10-hardy-superf...ll-garden/

Thinker, proud member of Realist News since Nov 2013.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
10-02-2018, 11:04 AM
Post: #6
Functional recycling: Spent Coffee Grounds Make Soil More Fertile
0
0
STOP THROWING AWAY YOUR COFFEE GROUNDS AND RECYCLE FOR MOTHER NATURE!!!

(Natural News) Once you are done with your cup of brewed coffee, what do you do with the used grounds? Do you throw them away as garbage or consign them to the compost heap? Spanish researchers believe that using spent coffee grounds as a means of organic soil amendment will offer many benefits in agriculture and for the environment. Coffee is a very popular and healthy drink. Its heavy global consumption produces six million tons of used grounds each year. A lot of this biological residue ends up in landfills, to rot alongside the rest of the garbage.

Finding practical uses for this waste will not just reduce overcrowding in landfills, it will also get good use out of the remaining nutrients in the material. Spent coffee grounds are made up of 82 percent carbohydrates and 13 percent proteins. Using it as an organic soil conditioner will greatly increase the amount of organic carbon in the soil.

Furthermore, it will:
https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-09-30-s...rtile.html

Thinker, proud member of Realist News since Nov 2013.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  UNLIMITED FREE ENERGY FOR EVERYONE!!! People4People 6 8,357 06-15-2017 11:17 PM
Last Post: Thinker
  Unlimited Free Energy Here Now! Three Devices Tested and Verified! Thinker 2 4,124 04-17-2015 06:20 PM
Last Post: Thinker
  Mosquito-Repelling Weeds That you can Plant this Spring in your Backyard Thinker 0 3,412 03-23-2015 02:06 PM
Last Post: Thinker

Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)